HOME OF THE KAMINISTIKOMINAHIKO-SKAK CREE NATION

Canadians Need To Know What is Going on in Their Own Back Yard

Canadians need to know what is going on in their own back yard!

Isn’t it ironic that Canada just celebrated it’s 144th birthday while basking in the glow of being known as a diverse and accepting nation (where people from other countries are welcomed with open arms), and yet the Original People of this Nation continue to fight for their right for recognition and to have Canada honour the spirit and intent of our Treaties? We are Canadians too!

FACT – On September 20, 1875 the John Cochrane First Nation - Kaministikominahiko-skak Cree people made treaty with the Crown as signatories to Treaty No. 5 at Beren’s River. The John Cochrane First Nation – Kaministikominahiko-skak Cree people are lawfully recognized as Treaty people.
FACT – Canada is committed to working with Aboriginal groups to address issues relating to Aboriginal and treaty rights through a variety of ongoing negotiation and discussion processes - “we are all treaty people” (Aboriginal Affairs & Northern web site).
FACT - For 136 years the John Cochrane First Nation – Kaministikominahiko-skak Cree people have been in dispute with the Canadian Government regarding infringements upon their individual and collective rights. We submitted the required documentation to the Canadian Government in 2006 and 2008 and to date have not received a response.
FACT - In 2009 an official request from the John Cochrane First Nation to join the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN) previously vetted and accepted by the Executive Council was overturned by Chief Lonechild in an unprecedented violation of the FSIN Convention Act. Through manipulation and tampering with the rules of the General Assembly, Lonechild maintained that “it is our mandate to promote the interests of band who are able to qualify as bands in Saskatchewan” suggesting he is not interested in upholding Customary International law and standards for protection of treaty rights.
FACT – On October 14, 2010 the Indigenous Nations Chiefs from Treaty 1 to 11 passed a resolution of support for John Cochrane First Nation - Kaministikominahiko-skak Cree people “to re-establish to gain all the rights, benefits, and lands guaranteed under Treaty No 5.” The Indigenous Nations Chiefs called for “a process based upon mutually beneficial relationships that form the spirit and intent of the treaties within current International Standards.”
FACT – On November 12, 2010 the Canadian Government endorsed the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The declaration is an International Human Rights Instrument that is legally binding as part of Customary International Human Rights Law.

FACT - The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples serves as a standard for promotion and protection of International Human Rights - A standard of measurement to which the Canadian government can be held to account in their obligations to uphold treaties.

FACT – Under the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples treaties must be kept. Therefore, under article 37 and article 40 of the Declaration, Canada has failed to uphold International Human Rights Standards for the John Cochrane First Nation – Kministikominahiko-skak Cree People.

Article 37
Indigenous peoples have the right to the recognition, observance and enforcement of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements concluded with States or their successors and to have States honour and respect such treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.

Article 40
Indigenous peoples have the right to access to and prompt decision through just and fair procedures for the resolution of conflicts and disputes with States or other parties, as well as to effective remedies for all infringements of their individual and collective rights. Such a decision shall give due consideration to the customs, traditions, rules and legal systems of the indigenous peoples concerned and international human rights.

Chief John Dorion